Oracle starts catering to JavaScript community with JET

During the last several years Oracle was working on their cloud solution, and several internal teams were creating JavaScript-based Web interfaces for the cloud. At some point Oracle decided to standardize on the set of JavaScript libraries used internally, and they also developed a set of reusable Web UI components both simple (e.g. buttons and forms) as well as complex (data grids, charts, accordion, and fancy gauges). All these components are based on jQuery UI and are responsive, so they can be used on mobile devices.

Having a nice set of UI components is great, but is not enough for building Web applications, so Oracle selected several popular JavaScript libraries to support routing, data binding, module loading et al.

All these things packaged together got a name JET (see, which is a toolkit for developing front end in JavaScript.

After downloading and unzipping one file you’ll get a set of well-known libraries (e.g. RequireJS, Knockout et al.) plus the library of the UI components developed by Oracle.

Based on the demo I’ve seen, it’s pretty easy to put up an application together using these components. Selecting any component from the JET Cookbook shows you a sample code that you can copy/paste in your HTML or JavaScript code.

I’ve asked Geertjan Wielenga, one of the JET product managers, if it’s possible to replace one of the libraries included into JET with another one. He responded positively and pointed me to this blog that shows how to use JET with AngularJS.

I’d be interested to see if JET’s UI components can be used together with other WebComponents-based libraries like Google Polymer. The other thing that I’d like to see if it’s possible to replace the module loader RequireJS with SystemJS that supports loading modules of different formats (including ES6 ones).

A JET plugin for the NetBeans IDE includes a convenient debugger that can be used inside the IDE. Oracle will offer support for JET, which is important for enterprise folks.

At the time of this writing the JET Website reads “Don’t use it in production (except if you’re an Oracle Cloud customer)”, but Oracle will open source it at some point in the near future, so everyone can use it both dev and prod. If I’m not mistaken, this will be the first organically open sourced Oracle product. By “organically” I mean that it came out of Oracle’s own initiative, rather than out of the takeover of another company. Try it out.

2 thoughts on “Oracle starts catering to JavaScript community with JET

  1. Hey Yakov, What’s your take on the Oracle v. Google Java lawsuit since you have 17 years experience developing in Java… do you think Farata Sys. has infringed on “proprietary” API’s? If you care to comment… at your own risk ;-/

    1. Farata is a consulting company that works for clients. Whatever code we write during the project belongs to them. So are the law suits about the licensing violations🙂

      Some clients don’t care. Some care too much. Past summer I was working for a financial client and created a solution that included changes in one file from Open JDK covered by the open source license that was not approved in tis organization. They dumped my solution even though it would help the app performance a lot (my entire gig was about improving performance).
      What can I say? It’s their call as long as check is in the mail…

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